Do You Really Need to Go to College?

There was a Forbes article, “Ten Smart Things I Learned from People Who Never Went to College” that got many people’s attention.

David DiSalvo talked about the wisdom shared by people who did not attend college; these were people he’s known, including many in his extended family. It was a compelling example of wisdom not being reserved for those who have many years of schooling, and that college education is not a measure of intelligence.

 

So, the question that begs to be asked is: do you really need to go to college?

 

To answer it, we have to look at the big picture and take many factors into consideration.

Some professions certainly require a thorough collegiate and also post-collegiate study, such as medical and engineering careers.

On the other hand, there are many jobs for which we tend to assume that a college degree is absolutely necessary – whereas the truth is it may not even be helpful. A rationale that having a four-year college degree automatically implies that the person would also possess a commitment to learning and a level of intelligence that is needed in the job holds little value, especially when compared to a person with no degree but with an impressive work experience and excellent references.

Then there are some people for whom college is simply not the best way to get education, more like a way to waste their time and money. Some people learn best on the job, acquiring experience and continuously polishing their skills by listening, observing, reading and applying. We all know at least one successful person who never went to college, or barely made it through college.

And, we most likely all know some people who excelled in college and can barely hold a job, or work in a job for which their degree does not even matter.

 

A college degree does not guarantee success – it simply shows you got a certification for having met a certain level of scholastic achievement. Your professional success will depend on many other factors that college education often does not provide.

 

Many people choose to bypass the longer and more expensive path of earning a bachelor’s degree and still end up with some of the nation’s highest-paying jobs, out-earning many four-year college graduates.

The fact is, degrees don’t always guarantee a job or have a limited market. We are learning that a broader view of educational options is needed – it can be formal, informal, self-directed, on the job training, professional licenses and certifications, etc.

This, paired with determination and enthusiasm to learn the type of skills actually needed in today’s marketplace, and the ability to continue learning, growing, and providing value for employers is what can open up paths to success.

 

It’s about the actions you take to achieve your dreams and goals in life.

 

If that means going to college to receive a 4-year degree, that’s great – attend college if you can and if you want to pursue a career that requires the kind of learning to be acquired there.

But if your dreams, goals, or circumstances take you on a path of getting the training on the job and studying at night to get a license or certification, then that’s awesome, too.  If you can’t afford college, or need to work to support your family – don’t let it get in your way of what’s possible and how you see yourself. You can still learn, grow and create a great life for yourself – and be an inspiration to people around you.

 

So, we believe it’s safe to say that having a college degree doesn’t guarantee you success, and that not having a college degree doesn’t inevitably guarantee failure.

 

For us at RODA marketing, the point has been to choose the career path that makes us happy, work hard, continue to learn and provide value to our clients, and success follows.

Check out our Internet marketing company’s portfolio and contact us to see how together we can take your business to higher levels of success with web design, SEO, and well thought-out digital and Internet marketing strategies.

 

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